First Batch of 2022 Bikeways and the Yonge street pilot gets extended until 2023!

A person rides a bike past people dining streetside

We did it. The past two days have been huge for fans of cycling and active transportation initiatives at City Hall! With the help of our volunteers, members, donors, supporters, plus City staff and City Councillors, Cycle Toronto was able to continue the momentum that was generated with the rapid installation of the popular ActiveTO program.

Contents:

  • Keeping ActiveTO Yonge & Bayview
  • New and Improved Bikeways
  • Winter snow clearing

Keeping ActiveTO Yonge & Bayview

While we haven’t heard much about the return of ActiveTO major road openings, the bike lanes installed on Yonge Street and Bayview Avenue have been approved to stay on the road for at least another year!

The midtown Yonge complete street pilot evaluation will be continued to January 2023 before a final recommendation is made. While the pilot is doing well by many measures, including increased cycling and walking trips in the area, popularity of CafeTO, and reducing speeding, there are some further adjustments proposed to support local businesses and residents, and to improve TTC’s shuttle bus operations. Cycle Toronto will have to continue working hard to make sure this project continues beyond 2023.    
 
The Bayview Ave (River St to Front St East) ActiveTO will stay in place at least until January 2023 as a safe detour for people walking and cycling along Bayview as the popular Lower Don Trail is closed for maintenance. 

New and Improved Bikeways

The first batch of bikeways approved for installation and improvement in 2022 shows a promising start to the new year and Cycling Network Plan. We’ll have to keep up this pace and more to hit the three-year 100+ km target set by the City. Look for new and better bikeways on these streets over the coming months.

New bikeways on the following streets:

 Improvements to existing cycling infrastructure on the following streets:

Full size map from City of Toronto

Snow Clearing

Toronto’s bike lanes and sidewalks went uncleared for as long as three weeks, this winter. The city’s active transportation routes were so inaccessible and treacherous that scenes of parents trying to scale snowbanks with strollers became commonplace. The City of Toronto’s inadequate response left many confined to cars or their homes. Prior to CIty Council’s meeting, we wrote in support of their request to consult with internal and external stakeholders on the preparation of an Extreme Winter Weather Response Plan. 

The item passed Council’s vote. Unfortunately, the report back on the Extreme Winter Weather Response Plan will be in early 2023, meaning the measures suggested in that report are not likely to be in place this upcoming winter.

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