#BuildTheGrid

On October 22, Torontonians elected our mayor and councillors for the next four years. These 26 individuals will make critical and lasting decisions affecting the future of mobility in our city—including how we design our streets.
 

Leading up to the election, Cycle Toronto collaborated with a coalition of road safety advocates to issue a survey to all candidates, including three questions that focused specifically on cycling.
 

Those three questions formed the backbone of our #BuildTheGrid municipal election campaign.
 

Pledge your support for the three #BuildTheGrid priorities right now.
 

Here is how Mayor John Tory responded to our three #BuildTheGrid questions:

  1. Do you commit to supporting building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors identified in The Cycling Network Plan?
      1. I know that central to the Vision Zero Plan is creating a network of safe, separated bike lanes. The Ten Year Cycling Plan we approved through City Council identifies approximately 525 centreline km of new cycling infrastructure to be built over the life of the plan. We will invest $154M to implement this plan, and will look to accelerate the plan, whenever possible, as we have with the Vision Zero plan over the past two years. Over the course of my term, Toronto has added nearly 50 km of new bike lanes and 13 km of trails. This includes important projects like the Bloor Street Bike Lanes, which were made permanent under my leadership, after being discussed for more than ten years.

     

  2. Do you commit to supporting building safe, connected routes in your ward as identified in the 10-Year Cycling Network Plan?
      2. I know that central to the Vision Zero Plan is creating a network of safe, separated bike lanes. The Ten Year Cycling Plan we approved through City Council identifies approximately 525 centreline km of new cycling infrastructure to be built over the life of the plan. We will invest $154M to implement this plan, and will look to accelerate the plan, whenever possible, as we have with the Vision Zero plan over the past two years. Over the course of my term, Toronto has added nearly 50 km of new bike lanes and 13 km of trails. This includes important projects like the Bloor Street Bike Lanes, which were made permanent under my leadership, after being discussed for more than ten years.

     

  3. Do you commit to supporting accelerating the Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years?
      3. I know that central to the Vision Zero Plan is creating a network of safe, separated bike lanes. The Ten Year Cycling Plan we approved through City Council identifies approximately 525 centreline km of new cycling infrastructure to be built over the life of the plan. We will invest $154M to implement this plan, and will look to accelerate the plan, whenever possible, as we have with the Vision Zero plan over the past two years. Over the course of my term, Toronto has added nearly 50 km of new bike lanes and 13 km of trails. This includes important projects like the Bloor Street Bike Lanes, which were made permanent under my leadership, after being discussed for more than ten years.

 

Find out whether or not your Councillor committed to #BuildTheGrid:

#BuildTheVisionTO: Safe and Active Streets for All

During the 2018 municipal election, Cycle Toronto worked in coalition with The Toronto Centre for Active Transportation (TCAT), 8 80 Cities, Friends and Families for Safe Streets, and Walk Toronto to promote road safety as an election issue. Together, we developed a survey with 15 priority asks, each tied to a municipal election priority for building streets where people of all ages and abilities can get around actively, sustainably and safely. We pitched the survey to every mayoral and council candidate.

Here is a visual breakdown of how council candidates responded from across the city:


On October 18, we released the complete survey results.

Click here for a summary of the 15 questions, read the CBC's coverage or check out the complete results from mayoral and council candidates.

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